Special Collections

The collection contains photographic materials, articles, programs and ephemera related to Hall's performance career.
This collection consists primarily of audio and video files of interviews with alumni of the African American Arts Institute at Indiana University, including students, administrators, and directors of performing ensembles. The majority of the interviews were conducted with members of the IU Soul Revue during its first ten years, under the direction of Dr. Portia K. Maultsby.
Video recording of an interview with the legendary gospel music pioneer Al Hobbs by Keith McCutchen and Fredara Hadley at Hobbs' Indianapolis home in June of 2007.
Six photographs from the 1950s, representing the Regals as well as the new Orioles group formed in 1955 by the merger of the Regals with the original Orioles, and featuring Al "Diz" Russell who has remained with the group to this day. Accompanied by photo descriptions in ms., possibly by Russell or Maultsby. Nine of the described photos are not represented in this collection.
The collection consists primarily of programs, newspaper and magazine clippings, photographs, awards, correspondence, memorabilia, audio recordings and video related to Angela Brown's career.
A live performance of the Anthony Gomes Band followed by a discussion at Indiana University on November 18, 1988.
The collection consists primarily of contracts and correspondence between Arizona Dranes and the Consolidated Music Publishing House (owner of the Chicago OKeh Records franchise) from 1926-1929. Contracts for Nov. 15, 1926, include one song not commercially released (and possibly not recorded), "He's Got Better Things for You." Also included are articles about Dranes and this collection by the donor, Malcolm Shaw, and gospel historian Dr. Daniel E. Walker.
The collection consists primarily of interviews and articles regarding radio stations and music in New Orleans, including information about the first African American deejays in New Orleans and the Poppa Stoppa radio program.
Press releases and administrative materials pertaining to the AAAMC website Black Grooves. The majority of material in this collection and on the website pertain to recordings in the AAAMC's general collections.
This collection documents a collaborative project between the Dutch Popular Music Institute and Dr. Portia K. Maultsby to study African American secular and sacred musical traditions in the Netherlands. Included are commercial recordings, photographs, clippings, and programs, as well as recordings, videos, and transcripts of interviews and performances collected during three successive research trips in 1998, 1999, and 2001.
The monthly magazine Black Music was published in London by IPC Specialist and Professional Press Ltd. from December 1973 until July 1984, when it was absorbed by Blues & Soul. Ray Coleman was Editor in Chief, Alan Lewis served as Editor, and staff writers included Tony Cummings and reggae historian Carl Gayle. The magazine's stated mission in the inaugural issue was to cover all Black music across the African diaspora, "from Harlem, New York, to Kingston, Jamaica, from London to Lagos." Regular columns included News, New Blood, Albums, Charts, New releases, Hey Mr. DJ, Crossword, Dave Godin, Gospel, What's Going On, and On Stage, Films, Books.
Production materials documenting Smithsonian's thirteen-part program on the role of radio in transforming the African American community in the twentieth century. The program was produced in 1996 by Jacquie Gales Webb for Smithsonian Productions, with assistance from the AAAMC. The collection contains over 400 hours of interviews and historical aircheck tapes in addition to articles, research files, program scripts, and transcripts. The audio interviews feature conversations with over 150 well-known disc jockeys, radio professionals, record company executives, journalists, and scholars. The historical airchecks include station identifications and jingles, radio interviews with prominent Black figures, coverage of historical events, and programs highlighting or influenced by the contributions of Black performers, disc jockeys, and other important persons in radio.
This collection consists of gospel song books and sheet music, song texts, photographs, and other ephemeral material related to Blondell Hill's participation with choirs in Richmond, Indiana, Petoskey, Michigan, and Harbor Springs, Michigan.
Personal memorabilia and awards documenting the career of gospel music legend Dr. Bobby Jones.
The Brian Lassiter Southern Rap Collection contains 3 series made up of various promotional materials, magazines and various media types related to the topic of Southern Rap music.
Periodicals covering popular and rhythm & blues musicians and recordings, but primarily collected for their articles focusing on vocal harmony groups and quartettes of the 1950s-1960s. Also included are articles by Tancredi and airchecks from his internet radio program, "Work With Me Annie."
This collection consists of printed and manuscript scores of music by Charles Coleman, including sacred and secular choral works, as well as ephemeral materials related to the composer.
Connor, known as "Little Richard's original drummer," has donated materials documenting the period he spent on the road with Little Richard, Sam Cooke, Dee Clark, Larry Williams, Chuck Willis, and others. Included are more recent articles, interviews, and audio recordings of Connor and an unpublished book manuscript.
Research on the Motown Record Corp., including photographs; Motown-related videos and television programs; and audio and video interviews with vocalists, instrumentalists, arrangers, songwriters, producers, technical staff, management, and consumers. Interviews include Thomas "Beans" Bowles (saxophonist and first road manager of the Motor Town Revue), Maxwell Powell (image specialist at Motown's Division of Artist Development), Bobby Rogers and Ronald White (vocalists with the Miracles), Sylvia Moy (songwriter), and Michael McLean (audio technician).
The collection consists of articles, clippings, and interviews compiled during research for Seymour's book, Luther: The Life and Longing of Luther Vandross (2004), and subsequent research on topics related to R&B musicians, black music genres, the black gay community and gay musicians. Also included are audiocassettes containing interviews conducted by Seymour with Luther Vandross, various R&B musicians and record company personnel, as well as a large collection of mixtapes and commercial CDs.
The collection consists of several interviews conducted by Craig Werner with musicians for his books Up around the Bend: The Oral History of Creedence Clearwater Revival (New York: Spike, 1998) and Higher Ground: Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Curtis Mayfield, and the Rise and Fall of American Soul (New York: Crown, 2004).
A collection of photographs of rhythm and blues musicians originally donated for use by Dr. Portia K. Maultsby and the Smithsonian Institution for the 1986 symposium and accompanying booklet and exhibition Rhythm and Blues, 1945-1955.
A live performance and discussion filmed during a Rock History course at Indiana University on September 10, 1998.
This collection consists of commercial gospel music videocassettes, commercial audio recordings, paper documents, schedules, promotional materials, photographs, and other ephemeral material related to Debbie May's career as a music producer.
The Deborah Smith Pollard collection includes more than 200 gospel music magazines and other publications from the 1980s to 2000s. The collection also includes Pollard's gospel music television specials, over 50 interviews she conducted with gospel artists and industry figures, airchecks of Pollard's radio program, Strong Inspirations, and radio programs hosted by other announcers.
Recorded interviews and transcripts, photographs, press clippings, posters, and research materials related to Detroit Techno music.
Videotapes covering the DMC Disc Jockey mixing competitions and instructional videos on mixing tips and tricks from world-renowned hip hop club DJs.
Photographs of Pookie Hudson and the Spaniels, including the Original Spaniels (whose members were from Gary, Indiana), the post-1956 Spaniels, and various later groups performing under the name Spaniels.
Materials documenting audiovisual exhibits produced by Donna Lawrence Productions. Included is the video documentary
Includes the personal papers of Edith Casteleyn, founder and director of Dutch community gospel choirs in the Netherlands, as well as scrapbooks, recordings, videos, clippings, programs, publicity materials, and photographs documenting the Friendship Gospel Choir, Lifeline Gospel Choir, Alive Choir, and the Rainbow Gospel Singers.
The collection consists of personal papers, photographs, and a video documenting the career Ed Castleberry, a pioneering black radio disc jockey and newscaster.
Personal papers documenting her journalism career, including recordings of over 100 interviews conducted for her book, Love, Peace, and Soul: Behind the Scenes of America's Favorite Dance Show Soul Train (2013), as well as interviews with many other R&B, jazz, rock and rap musicians.
Every Voice and Sing: The Choral Music Legacy of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities is a 5-part series on Black choral music that explores the social/political context of the Civil War/Reconstruction era that brought about the formation of these Historically Black Colleges and Universities and their amazing Singing Groups. The project is collaborative production of EVT Educational Productions, Inc. and JAZZ88.3FM WBGO Radio of Newark, New Jersey. The series was broadcast by over 240 public radio stations.
Extensions of the Tradition is an annual event featuring a concert of music by black composers with related exhibits and programs, co-sponsored by Indiana University's African American Arts Institute, the AAAMC, and the Jacobs School of Music. The event is documented through program booklets, flyers, photographs, and video and audio recordings.
Includes several photographs and sheet music with images of gospel musician Rosetta Tharpe.
A large collection of publicity photographs compiled by the AAAMC, primarily of singers, musicians, and musical groups from the 1970s to 1990s.
Collection consists of black and white photographs from the 1950s through the early 1980s related to KYOK in Houston. Including are images documenting the activities of KYOK's deejays in the studio and surrounding communities, particularly in connection with listener contests and station-sponsored events such as dances and the "We Love You" concert. Also included are photographs of KYOK publicity materials and publicity photographs of many of the rhythm and blues artists, jazz, and blues artists featured on the station.
The collection consists primarily of music manuscripts of works composed, arranged and transcribed by Gertrude Rivers Robinson, ranging from her student years to her time as a professor and professional composer.
The collection includes 11 issues of the periodical Gospel News Journal. The collection does not contain a complete run of the Journal, but includes issues from Volumes 2-5, dating from 1966-1968.
Articles, magazines, radio programs, and interviews on hip hop music and culture by journalist and "media assassin" Harry Allen.
Postcards from the 1991 series Sisters of the Harlem Renaissance: The Found Generation 1920-1932.
Collection documenting the AAAMC's 2014 panel discussion and exhibit, Hot Buttered Soul: The Role of Foodways & Musicmaking in Building and Sustaining African American Communities, which explored the intersections between sacred and secular music genres and traditional foodways as signifiers of African American life and culture. Featured panelists include Psyche Williams-Forson, Tyron Cooper, Alisha Lola Jones, and Mellonee Burnim. Includes audio, video, image, and research files.
A collection documenting the career of Black radio pioneer "Jockey Jack" Gibson. Includes a complete set of Mello Yello, the oldest black trade magazine targeted to Black radio and the music industry, published by Gibson from 1976-1996. Also included are original air-check tapes, an unreleased video documentary about Gibson, audio and video interviews with Jack Gibson and various colleagues, souvenir programs from "The Family Affair" (the oldest black radio and black music convention hosted by Jack Gibson), and photographs of radio personalities and rhythm & blues artists.
Materials documenting Gales Webb's career as an award-winning producer and host of "Sunday Afternoon Gospel Music Program" on 96.3 WHUR in Washington, DC. Includes interviews and production materials used in the public radio series Remembering Slavery and Jazz Singers, the television documentary Melodies from Heaven, the video for the Smithsonian Institution's exhibit Beyond Category: The Music of Duke Ellington, and her materials related to SC 39: Black Radio: Telling it Like it Was (a radio series also produced by Gales Webb).
Collection consists of casting, production, and promotional materials used by James Spooner in the production of his film White Lies, Black Sheep and materials associated with the film Afro-Punk including interview footage, promotional materials, film festival awards, and periodicals in which the film and/or Spooner was highlighted.
Papers, clippings and photographs pertaining to the founding and early years of the Black Rock Coalition.
A collection of photographs of rhythm and blues musicians originally donated for use by Dr. Portia K. Maultsby and the Smithsonian Institution for the 1986 symposium and accompanying booklet and exhibition Rhythm and Blues, 1945-1955.
Doug "Jocko" Henderson was a pioneering "rapping" deejay primarily associated with Philadelphia radio station WDAS in the 1970s. Collection primarily documents Henderson's Get Ready company, which published materials to be used in schools to teach American history, spelling, and the dangers of drug abuse using rap lyrics. Also included is material documenting Henderson's bid for a seat in the United States House of Representatives in Pennsylvania. Materials include audiocassettes, teaching manuals, correspondence, photographs, business cards, press clippings, flyers, and other memorabilia.
Photographs documenting rural life in the Mississippi Delta from the 1950s to the 1970s.
The collection consists of materials collected by Jackson during research for his book A House On Fire: The Rise and Fall of Philadelphia Soul. Includes audiocassettes of interviews conducted by Jackson primarily by telephone, interview transcripts, related articles, and book drafts.
Clippings, photographs, and audiocassette copies of airchecks compiled as "Sounds of the Fifties & Sixties" - radio programs as broadcast by well known WLAC deejay John R.
More than 300 record albums from the late 1950s through the early 1980s by various blues, gospel, jazz, rhythm and blues, rock, funk, and disco artists; a video taped performance of Johnny Griffith and jazz guitarist Kenny Burrell; personal recordings and a musical score by Griffith; and a taped interview with Griffith and an interview transcript.
Original video masters for thirteen Johnny Otis Show television programs, taped in a Los Angeles studio by Griffith between 1974-1975 and featuring such guest artists as Delmar "Mighty Mouth" Evans, Marie Adams & the Three Tons of Joy, Joe Turner, Shuggie Otis, Pee Wee Crayton, and Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson. Also included are five hours of unedited footage from Johnny Otis's Oldies But Goodies musical revue, a live show in L.A. that featured popular artists of the rock & roll era lip-synching to their hit recordings. Taped by Griffith from 1975-1977, over 100 songs are performed by artists such as Emma James, Richard Berry, the Penguins, the Coasters, Shirley & Lee, Ted Taylor, Bobby Day, and the Medallions.
Over 800 radio programs of black popular music (live and prerecorded), hosted by Johnny Otis, and featuring live interviews with blues and rhythm & blues artists from the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. Artists interviewed include Little Esther Phillips, Al Frazier, Mary Wells, Zola Taylor, the Coasters, Horace Silver, the Robins, Etta James, Big Jay McNeely, Bobby Day, Bumps Blackwell, Pee Wee Crayton, Jimmy McCracklin, and Joe Liggins. The radio programs are jointly held with the Archives of Traditional Music at Indiana University. Also included are photographs, memorabilia, books, and compact discs.
Collection consists primarily of interview transcripts, program transcripts, and artist publicity materials used in the production of the Westwood One Radio programs Special Edition, That's Country Music, Rock Chronicles, My Top Ten, and History of Rock 'n Roll. It also contains materials from various specials including programs on Elvis Presley, Jimi Hendrix, and the Rolling Stones.
Collection consists of materials related to Lewis's work at the WERD radio station in the 1950s and '60s. Founded by Jesse B. Blayton, Sr. in October 1949 in Atlanta, Georgia, WERD was the first black owned and operated radio station in the United States. The collection materials comprise 7 black and white and 7 color photographs documenting WERD's early history. Content includes the exterior of the WERD studio building, publications related to WERD such as photographs of an issue of The Printed WERD, and a portrait of J.B. Blayton Sr.
Airchecks from the radio series "Lessons in Jazz," produced by Kevin Anderson for MD Illegal Rap Radio. The series began airing in 2002 on Hampton University's student radio station WHOV 88.1 FM. Co-hosts of the series are Marcel "Big Cel" Canady and Montez "The Wiz" Martin.
The collection consists primarily of audio tapes of two radio programs produced by Bailey Broadcasting Services: The Hip Hop Countdown & Report (1991-1998) and RadioScope: The Entertainment Magazine of the Air (1990-1996). Press releases for RadioScope broadcasts are also included.
Scrapbook, press materials, and recordings documenting Tillery's career as lead singer for the Los Angeles rock band The Loading Zone, as well as her work with the Cultural Heritage Choir and other groups.
Personal papers related to Westbrook's career as a music industry executive, entrepreneur, religious leader, and teacher. The collection documents his years at CBS Records, Soul Train Records and Source Records, as well as his affiliation with the Church of God in Christ and his many philanthropic activities. Included are commercial and non-commercial audio and video recordings, ledgers, photographs, awards, memorabilia, posters, and clippings.
The collection consists of materials related to Smithsonian Institution programs, including the Duke Ellington Youth Project, in addition to gospel sheet music and related research materials from George's personal collection.
Music promoter Mark del Costello has assembled archival footage of black performers, as well as souvenir programs, posters, and photographs related to shows he has produced.
The collection consists primarily of materials collected during research for Mahon's book Right to Rock: The Black Rock Coalition and the Cultural Politics of Race (Duke University Press, 2004). Includes photographs, promotional postcards and fliers, posters, newspaper clippings, concert programs, and ephemera. Audiovisual media includes commercial CDs and audiocassettes, and videocassettes with television and live performance clips.
The collection includes Burnim's dissertation research on African American religious music conducted primarily in Indiana between 1976-1979 with an emphasis on gospel music performance and practice; and post-dissertation research on African and African American religious music conducted between 1980-1996 in the U.S., Cuba, Liberia, and Malawi. Also included is documentation of the 1984 Smithsonian American Folklife Festival and gospel sheet music. The collection was primarily recorded on analog audio formats and includes audiocassettes, open reel tapes, videocassettes, open reel video, slides, sheet music, song texts, and additional documentation.
A collection of artist publicity photographs of rhythm and blues musicians from the 1940s-1950s.
The collection consists primarily of magazines and special commemorative publications released immediately following Jackson's death in 2009.
Collection includes audiocassette recordings of interviews about Ray Charles for Lydon's book Ray Charles : Man and Music (2004), a radio series about Ray Charles based on Lydon's book, complete or partial transcripts for many of the interviews organized loosely into book chapters, interviews with and about other African American musicians, class lectures given by Lydon at Indiana University and related publicity materials, and original music performed by Lydon.
The Michael McAlpin Collection consists primarily of print materials used in the production of the PBS television documentary Record Row: the Cradle of Rhythm and Blues. Included are production materials and interview transcripts created during Dr. Portia Maultsby's collaboration on the project as AAAMC director as well as VHS tapes of the rough cut, final broadcast version, and local coverage of the documentary.
Programs, press releases, audio recordings, and manuscript charts for jazz compositions composed by Hamilton College music professor Michael "Doc" Woods.
A collection of commercial compact discs, audio cassettes, videotapes, LPs, and books on rap music and hip hop culture. Also included is a copy of White's MA thesis, "The High Fidelity Turntable System and the Creation of Hip Hop Music" (Univ. of Washington, 1996), supplemented by video footage of DJs demonstrating turntable techniques.
The complete catalog of Mr. R&B Records, a reissue label based in Sweden, including nearly 200 LPs of blues, rhythm and blues, jazz, and gospel music from the 1930s through the 1960s.
Magazines and articles collected by Murray Forman during research for his book, The 'Hood Comes First: Race, Space, and Place in Rap and Hip-Hop (Wesleyan University, 2002).
The collection consists primarily of materials collected during research for Nelson George's book Where Did Our Love Go?: The Rise and Fall of the Motown Sound (St. Martin's Press, 1985). This includes interviews (audiocassettes and transcripts), photographs, newspaper clippings, magazines, photocopies of legal documents, manuscripts, and correspondence.
Personal papers consisting of published and unpublished articles and liner notes by Nations, primarily on the topics of early rhythm and blues and gospel music. Also included are the audio files for nearly 500 gospel music CDs issued by Nations on his Pewburner Records label.
Video, programs and clippings documenting Rushen's lectures at Indiana University in 1997.
Research materials and recordings collected by Turner for her two groundbreaking discographies Afro-American Singers: An Index and Preliminary Discography of Long-Playing Recordings of Opera, Choral Music, and Song (1977) and the Dictionary of Afro-American Performers: 78 rpm and Cylinder Recordings of Opera, Choral Music, and Songs, c. 1900-1949 (1990). Includes 78 rpm records, cylinder recordings and sheet music, many documenting the works of early Black composers, as well as interpretations of their music by white artists. Though primarily focused on classical vocal music and musical theater, recordings also include performances by jubilee and gospel quartet groups, blues, rhythm and blues, and jazz musicians. Research files include 5 boxes of programs, clippings and photographs of Black artists and composers.
Selection of DVDs documenting the Indianapolis television series "Hit Makers Showcase," a local talent show produced by Middlebrook that aired from 1983-1989. Also includes a DVD with a performance by the Indianapolis group The PHDs, and the CD Old School Songs of Love by Middlebrook.
A collection of 100 publicity photographs of Black artists featured in PBS television programs from 1972-2005.
Personal papers, audio and video recordings, posters, costumes and memorabilia documenting the career of the country soul singer-songwriter.
The Phyl Garland Collection consists primarily of personal papers, including original typescripts for Garland's columns in Ebony and Stereo Review, and related research and photographs. Also included are 41 original audiocassette recordings of interviews conducted by Garland (except as noted) primarily with various African American musicians, artists, and filmmakers. Topics include African American composers and musicians as well as various genres of music including, but not limited to, jazz, R&B, soul, rock, classical, and blues. Record company publicity materials include publicity photos and press releases for over 900 artists.
Series G, "Music Industry Interviews," consists of transcripts and audiocassettes of interviews primarily conducted by Portia K. Maultsby between 1981-1986 as part of her research on the Black music industry. The remainder of the series in this collection are still in the process of being accessioned and are unavailable for general research and public use.
The collection consists primarily of magazines and special commemorative publications; some were published prior to the artist's death.
This collection consists of documentation and one-on-one interviews from the AAAMC's two-day conference on Black rock hosted on the Indiana University-Bloomington campus on November 13-14, 2009. The conference and related activities were open to local and regional musicians, scholars, students, and brought together Black rock musicians from different generations and regions with music critics and scholars to discuss the socio-political history, musical developments, and the future of Black rock.
A collection of SOUL and Soul Illustrated magazines published in Los Angeles from 1966-1982.
Materials compiled during the production of the Rhythm & Blues Foundation's Let the Good Times Roll, a series of hour-long radio programs hosted by Jerry "The Iceman" Butler and distributed by National Public Radio. Included are photographs, transcripts of interviews with various musicians featured on the shows, publicity materials, and a complete set of the radio programs on compact disc.
Collection consists primarily of materials related to Roberts's work at KYOK-AM in the 1960s and '70s including images of KYOK sponsored events such as the "We Love You" concert and associated publicity materials, a beauty pageant, radio contests, and on-site broadcasts throughout Houston. Also included are photographs of KYOK radio personalities and staff as well as candid and publicity photographs of visiting R&B artists.
Bob Marovich is a gospel music historian, author, and radio host. This collection consists of one series made up of recordings and transcripts of interviews that Marovich conducted with a variety of gospel music pioneers while writing A City Called Heaven: Chicago and the Birth of Gospel Music. The interviews discuss the musicians' lives and careers, as well as spirituality and the gospel genre as a whole.
The Ronald Lewis collection contains press releases, article clippings, concert flyers, posters, advertisements, sound recordings and video documenting Lewis' career as a musician, record label owner, and producer in Louisville, KY.
The collection consists of research materials, including press releases, newspaper and magazine clippings, and interviews related to Sarig's book Third Coast: OutKast, Timbaland, and How Hip-Hop Became a Southern Thing (Da Capo Press, 2007). The collection documents Southern hip hop ranging from Houston to Miami to Virginia Beach, and focuses on key artists in each state.
Collection documenting the AAAMC's October 2006 conference at Indiana University featuring Detroit deejays Juan Atkins, Mike Clark, Terrence Parker, Cornelius Harris, DJ Minx, Theo Parish, Rick Wilhite, Malik Pittman. Moderators include Denise Dalphond and Beverly May. Included are photographs and video files of the conference panels and the closing concert at the Second Story Night Club, research materials, and commercial recordings donated by participants.
Photographs documenting the career of Houston deejay Skipper Lee Frazier, copied from his personal collection. Additional photo descriptions with biographical information transcribed from an interview with Frazier are available in accession folder. The collection consists of 12 b&w photographs with negatives primarily documenting Skipper Lee Frazier's activities in connection with KCOH in Houston during the 1970s and '80s.
This collection consists primarily of interviews conducted by AAAMC assistant director Stephanie Shonekan and director Portia K. Maultsby for the exhibit, Something in the Water : The Sweet Flavor of Dayton Funk, hosted by the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center in Wilberforce, Ohio. The exhibit was organized by NAAMCC curator Michael Sampson and Portia K. Maultsby with consultation by Ricky Vincent and was on display from October 3, 1998 through February through February 1999.
Interviews conducted for the Indiana Historical Society Exhibit, "Soul and Funk: the Naptown Sound" (2005), a collaborative project between the AAAMC and the IHS. Features interviews with various Indianapolis musicians such as Alan Bacon, James Bell, Clint Jones, Lester Johnson, Paul Middlebrook, Dick Pierson, Matthew Watson, and Rodney Stepp, as well as exhibit photographs, audio and video documentation, and production materials.
A selection of 45 rpm discs from the Jewel, Ronn, Paula, and Susie Q record labels.
Collection of recorded performances and interviews with blues musicians conducted from 1995-1998 in Bloomington, Indianapolis, and Chicago that were utilized in Oehler's dissertation, "Aesthetics and Meaning in Professional Blues Performances: An Ethnographic Examination of an African American Music in intercultural Context" (Indiana University, 2001). Also included are several tapes recorded in Ghana in 1995 that document Ghanaian performing arts.
Assorted magazines and memorabilia on various topics related to Black culture.
Collection includes magazines published by Teresa Hairston including Gospel Today, Gospel Industry Today and Score, as well as materials used in the production of the magazine including interviews (audio), publicity photographs, and press releases related to gospel artists, preachers, organizations, and the music industry. There is extensive documentation (images, videos) of the annual Gospel Heritage Festival, the Gospel Today television series, Gospel Heritage Praise & Worship Conference, and other events and productions managed by Hairston. Also included are over 5000 commercial sound recordings (CD, LP, audiocassette) and commercially produced videos and DVDs of gospel music and religious programs. The latter are being added to IUCAT and can be searched using the keywords "Teresa Hairston Collection" (follow this link to search results)
Audio recordings of taped radio show episodes, primarily from the series The Afro-American in Indiana, but also including the additional programs Reflections in Black and Black Heritage, as well as a radio special and recordings from a NAACP convention. The radio shows, hosted by Fr. Boniface Hardin, featured multiple high-profile guests. The episode topics includes sports, music, education, historiography, slavery, the American Civil War, Reconstruction, segregation, the Indiana Constitution, the United States Constitution, church, religion, the NAACP, WWI, WWII, medicine, black businesses, the Institute of Afro American Studies, prison, labor history, and more.
This collection includes interviews and research materails used for the production of the book The Black Composer Speaks (1978), a project initiated by the Afro-American Arts Institute at Indiana University, and co-edited by Lida M. Belt, David N. Baker and Herman C. Hudson. The majority of the interviews were conducted by Lida Belt (Baker).
A collection of manuscript and printed scores, recordings, interviews, and photographs. Composers represented in the collection include Michael Abels, Lettie Alston, T.J. Anderson, Regina Harris Baiocchi, David Baker, William Banfield, Charles Coleman, William Dawson, Bethenia Ferrell, Donal Fox, Carl Maultsby, Portia Maultsby, Lena McLin, Dorothy Rudd Moore, Kermit Moore, Undine Smith Moore, Gary Powell Nash, Stephen Newby, Daniel Roumain, Kevin Scott, Hale Smith, William Henry Smith, Howard Swanson, Frederick Tillis, Gregory Walker, Julius Williams, and Michael Woods.
Draper's collection documents the career of an African American music executive and covers his tenures at RCA Records and Warner Bros. Records.
Books and videos documenting black music in Los Angeles.
A small collection of photographs from the 1950s-1960s.
Black radio photograph collection documenting events and personnel, including photos with rhythm and blues musicians, at Houston station KCOH in the 1960s and 1970s. Photographs were copied from the personal collection of Gardner. Accompanied by a transcription of an interview with Gardner which includes descriptions of each photograph.
This collection consists of published and manuscript scores of Moore's music, as well as photographs of Moore and videos containing performances and interviews.
The collection consists primarily of materials related to the gospel musicals Mama, I Want to Sing ; Mama, I Want to Sing II; and Born to Sing! Mama 3. It includes scripts, programs, promotional materials, posters, photographs, videos, and sound recordings. Records of the Mama Foundation include programs, press clippings, publicity, and posters.
A 26-part series on gospel music conceived and hosted by Bernice Johnson Reagon and produced by National Public Radio. The series is accompanied by a curriculum guide.
Over 200 radio programs on black popular music from the 1970s and 1980s produced by Karen Shearer Productions for Westwood One. The programs include narration, interviews and recordings by artists such as the O'Jays, Tina Turner, Bobby Bland, Curtis Mayfield, Natalie Cole, B. B. King, Little Richard, Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight and the Pips, Earth, Wind & Fire, Kool & the Gang, War, Patti LaBelle, the Staple Singers, the Spinners, Isaac Hayes, Diana Ross, the Jacksons, Peabo Bryson, the Commodores, Ashford & Simpson, Larry Graham, Isley Brothers, Barry White, George Benson, Aretha Franklin, the Pointer Sisters, Patrice Rushen, the Dells, Al Green, the Chi-Lites, Parliament-Funkadelic, Deniece Williams, the Ohio Players, Jerry Butler, Johnnie Taylor, the Four Tops, Teddy Pendergrass, Herbie Hancock, Booker T. and the MGs, Quincy Jones, the Temptations, Donna Summer, Zapp, and Luther Vandross. Transcriptions are available for some interviews and programs. This collection is jointly held with the Archives of Traditional Music at Indiana University.
These materials comprise a thirteen-part radio series of public service broadcasts produced by Sam Chase for WLIB radio in New York in cooperation with Newsweek Magazine.
Collection documenting the AAAMC's 2011 conference Why We Sing: Indianapolis Gospel Music in Church, Community, and Industry. Participants include Al Hobbs, Leonard Scott, Sherri Garrison, Rodnie Bryant, Lamar Campbell, Thomas A. Hill, Liz Dixson, and Tracy Williamson. Conference documentation includes photographs and video files of the three panels, pre-conference interviews with panelists, and the closing concert. Also included are images and research files related to the accompanying exhibit, and audio and video files of post-conference interviews with Carla Poindexter, Kenneth Woods, Jr., and Rev. Melvin B. Girton about the history of gospel music in Indianapolis.
Personal papers related primarily to Black radio, including press clippings, published and unpublished articles, and other research materials used by Barlow for his monograph Voice Over: The Making of Black Radio (Temple University Press, 1999). Also included are Barlow's interviews with various blues artists and some recorded performances, collected during the course of research for his book "Looking Up at Down": The Emergence of Blues Culture (Temple University Press, 1989).
This collection documents the activities of Dr. Winona Fletcher as Producing Director of the Indiana University Afro-American Arts Institute's 1986 revival of the Federal Theatre Project's 1939 production Prelude to Swing, entitled Prelude to Swing +50.